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Post by destinyros2005 » 10/14/05 11:30

ABC dominates Wed. with 'Lost' power

CBS' dramas showed a little spunk Wednesday, but ABC still owned the night with "Lost."

The new Freddie Prinze, Jr. comedy "Freddie" also got off to a reasonably good start for ABC at 8:30 p.m., improving slightly on its " George Lopez" lead-in and capitalizing on its proximity to "Lost." UPN was in the game at 8 p.m. with "America's Next Top Model."

ABC's 9 p.m. hotshot yielded an average of 21.7 million viewers and a 9.4 rating/22 share in the adults 18-49 demographic, according to Nielsen Media Research. "Lost" has cooled a little since it opened its sophomore season last month with 23 million viewers and a 25 share in adults 18-49, but it is nonetheless duking it out with CBS' "CSI: Crime Scene Investigation" and ABC's "Desperate Housewives" for the top rungs of primetime's 18-49 demo rankings.

CBS' freshman "Criminal Minds" (13.8 million, 4.2/10) moved the needle significantly from its past two airings despite facing stiff competition from ABC's 9 p.m. monster. NBC's "The Apprentice: Martha Stewart" (6.9 million, 2.6/6) also inched up from the previous week, but not by much.

At 10 p.m., CBS' "CSI: NY" (15.2 million, 5.3/14) built on "Minds' " momentum to top ABC's freshman "Invasion" (11.6 million, 4.8/12) -- a noteworthy feat given "Invasion's" lead-in advantage -- and NBC's "Law & Order" (10.9 million, 3.5/9).

At 8 p.m., ABC led the hour with "Lopez" (8.8 million, 3.4/10) and the debut of "Freddie" (9.4 million, 4.2/11), which took its lumps from critics. NBC didn't do much business in the hour with the drama "E-Ring" (8.7 million, 2.3/7), nor did CBS with its comedy combo of "Still Standing" (7.5 million, 2.3/7) and "Yes, Dear" (8.8 million, 3.0/8).

UPN's "Top Model" (5.5 million, 2.7/8) continued its forward motion, growing from last week in all key measures and hitting an impressive 5.2/15 in women 18-34. Its 9 p.m. companion "Veronica Mars" (3 million, 1.3/3), however, is still struggling to hold on to that lead-in.

WB Network slogged through the night with lackluster turnouts for the dramas "One Tree Hill" (3.1 million, 1.4/4) and "Related" (2.6 million, 1.1/3).

Fox was in baseball zone again on Wednesday with regionally divided coverage of Game 2 of the American League Championship Series and Game 1 of the National League Championship Series. For the night, Fox averaged 12.6 million viewers and a 4.0/11.

Still, ABC had no competition for the nightly bragging rights with an average of 14 million viewers and a 6.0/16 in adults 18-49.

From: Reuters

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Post by destinyros2005 » 10/14/05 11:32

'Lost' Star Grateful to Honolulu Police

Josh Holloway, who plays con man Sawyer on the ABC castaway drama "Lost," said Thursday he was grateful to Honolulu police for their help after a reported armed robbery at his Hawaii Kai home.

But the actor who cuts a volatile, angry figure in the series had nothing to say about the robbery itself in a statement released by Touchstone Television. KHON-TV reported that he and his wife, Yessica, were held at gunpoint early Wednesday morning by a man still at large.

"My family and I are fine and appreciate everyone's concerns and good thoughts," Holloway said in the statement. "We are very grateful for the help of the Honolulu Police Department and the support of the local community."

KHON reported that Holloway and his wife were rousted from bed. The robber took cash and credit cards and then drove off in Holloway's Mercedes-Benz, which was found abandoned a short time later, the station reported.

There was no indication the robber recognized the 36-year-old actor, KHON reported.

The Honolulu Police Department referred questions to the detective assigned to the case, who wasn't immediately available for comment.

From: The Associated Press

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Post by destinyros2005 » 10/18/05 09:56

Mad for the mythology of 'Lost'
Fans of the ABC drama about plane crash survivors on a mysterious island love to search for clues.
By Stephen Kiehl
Sun Reporter

Alarm bells sounded for Brigit Wampler while watching an episode of Lost one day last spring. She noticed that Boone, a pretty young man stranded on the island with his sister, was wearing a red shirt. Of course, Wampler knew, he was going to die.

She remembered the old Star Trek cliche that any character who didn't have a last name and was wearing a red shirt would be dead by the end of the episode. Sure enough, two weeks later, Boone was checking out a plane trapped in a tree canopy when the plane fell to the ground. Boone was killed.

"I got the reference but I didn't really think they were going to kill him off," says Wampler, 46, a Western Maryland resident who says Lost is the only show for which she puts aside her knitting. "It's pretty much the only show I put all my concentration into, and not because I'm lacking in the brains department."

Lost, a sort of Gilligan's Island update with more attractive castaways and a spookier island, has become one of TV's top shows. Now in its second season, the ABC drama is drawing more than 20 million viewers per week. A fraction of them have become Lost fanatics, poring over every episode to find literary, cultural and mythological allusions that may explain the show's mystery - what is happening on the island, how are the characters related, why did their plane crash and what does it all mean?

These hyper-fans tape every episode so they can go back to pause the action and search for clues that appear onscreen for only a split-second. The briefest glimpse of a character reading, say, Watership Down, can lead to days of speculation on Lost message boards.

"I watch Lost twice," Wampler says. "I watch it once on the edge of my seat, with my hand over my mouth, going, 'Oh my gosh!' And the second time it's a little more relaxed because I know what the story's going to be and I go, 'Oh yeah, this makes sense.' "

The Lost obsessives have formed communities on the Internet, where endless debates rage about the meaning of certain numbers and symbols that appear on the show. Thefuselage.com, which Wampler moderates, has 20,000 registered members, while lost-tv.com has 11,000 members.

The college radio station at the Pennsylvania College of Technology in Williamsport has established a weekly two-hour Lost radio program. It's broadcast live over the station's Web site, but the computer servers often crash because so many fans from around the world are trying to listen at once.

Lost's writers and producers seem surprised - in a good way - about the rabid nature of these fans. Some of the writers answer questions on the fan Web sites, though they are often hopelessly vague. Or just confused. One fan wrote in seeking confirmation of the title of a TV show being watched by a character experiencing a flashback (Sentai or Power Rangers, the fan wondered).

Javier Grillo-Marxuach, a supervising producer and writer on the show, responded, "Wow! you guys are like the talmudic scholars of Lost - seriously, I have NO idea."

A recurring mystery of the show has to do with the numbers that keep popping up. One of the characters had once won the lottery with the numbers 4-8-15-16-23-42. Viewers note that the flight number for the doomed plane that crashed on the island was 815. Also, they note, there was a $23,000 reward out for the capture of the Kate character.

The castaways have found a hatch on their island. When they open it up, they find a man inside who says he must punch those numbers - 4-8-15-16-23-42 - into a computer every 108 minutes or something terrible will happen. Of course, if you add up those six numbers, you get 108.

What does it mean? Are the writers just having fun with fans?

"We know that there's very little that occurs in Lost that was not planned by the creative staff," says Kit Cleary, a San Diego financial adviser who helps run the lost-tv.com site. "They're not just throwing pasta up against the wall and seeing what sticks. They know what direction they're headed in. They know what the mythology of the island is, and that's key."

Cleary has some of her own ideas. She thinks the survivors are part of a social experiment gone horribly awry, since they are so dysfunctional. She's also picked up on the show's biblical references. She notes that the first season represented 40 days on the island.

"That is not accidental," she says. "That's a magical number that represents some sort of a cleansing process where you go into yourself and then you come back and you're a different person."

Cleary has also picked up on parallels with Joseph Campbell's book The Hero's Journey, in which an individual goes on a journey, dies and is reborn. "These people have died, so to speak," she says of the Lost characters, "and are reborn. This is their second chance."

Lost fans have held parties in hotels and attended conventions to meet one another. Often on Wednesday nights, they gather to watch the show together. This past Wednesday, Caren Chancey invited Wampler, thefuselage.com moderator, and her friend Melissa Cavanaugh to her Mount Vernon townhouse.

They ordered pizzas from Papa John's and sat on the edge of the couch through the hour-long program. "There's the bottle - oohh!" Wampler said when a wine bottle filled with messages from the survivors washed back onshore.

They were careful to watch for recurrences of the magic numbers. Sure enough, when one survivor encountered a woman from another group of survivors, he asked how many were in her group. "Twenty-three," she said.

Chancey and her friends also noted that a dharma symbol that had appeared on a shark's skin was now on a wall in a bunker. She wasn't sure what to make of it, or much of anything in the show.

"Every time I come up with an idea for what it means," she said, "the writers shoot it down in the next episode."

From: The Baltimore Sun

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Post by destinyros2005 » 11/19/05 06:16

"Lost" Finds Its Calling

Lost has already made its mark on the small screen. Now it's heading to the really small screen.

The Emmy-winning series is launching its first spinoff, Lost Video Diaries, to play exclusively on mobile phones beginning early next year, according to the Hollywood Reporter.

Producers will shoot roughly 20 mobisodes--mobile phone episodes, that is--in all, with each one just several minutes long.

The miniseries will introduce two new characters who have been stranded on Mystery Island alongside the regular cast, with prime-time episodes informing the duo's weekly story lines. (Per the body count at the Sledgeweb Lost fansite, there are 46 adults left from the plane crash, plus Claire's baby, but only 17 of them get significant face time, leaving plenty of room for newbies.)

Production on the mobisodes kicks off in Hawaii next month, though under different supervision than the ABC show.

Executive producers Damon Lindelof and Carlton Cuse will solely oversee the Lost Video Diaries, with regular series producers ABC and Touchstone Television not involved.

There's no word yet on which carrier will nab the exclusive rights to the phone series, though Verizon's VCast is the current front-runner on the soon-to-be-completed deal, due to an ongoing relationship with Disney, which owns ABC.

Should the Lost Video Diaries find their home with Verizon, it's unclear whether the episodes would be covered in the $15 per month VCast content subscription or if they would fall under the category of "premium content" and be priced at 99 cents a pop.

It's also likely that the mobispodes would become available for iPods after the show's exclusivity deal with a mobile phone service expires. Regular episodes can already be downloaded from the iTunes Music Store for 99 cents. (Apple announced this week that Lost is the most popular of all programs available on the iTunes Music Store.)

But Lost isn't the first show to make the move to mobile phones.

Last year, Fox's 24 partnered with Vodafone and spun off its own cell series, 24: Conspiracy.

Twenty four 60-second episodes were produced and made available for download last spring through Verizon's VCast service. Unlike the new Lost series, however, the story line in 24: Conspiracy was thematically similar to its Kiefer Sutherland-manned counterpart, but not derived from it.

The new cell phone series isn't the only side project Lost producers have up their sleeves.

Earlier this month, ABC announced plans to introduce a subplot to the show about a character named Gary Troup, a fictitious author who died in the crash of Oceanic Flight 815, but not before he dropped off a manuscript with his publisher.

ABC teamed with Hyperion Books to publish the supposed manuscript, titled Bad Twin, which will be written by a name-brand author with guidance from show writers.

The mystery book focuses on a rich heir's search for his devious sibling, and hits stores this spring.

From: Yahoo News

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Post by destinyros2005 » 01/13/06 17:57

ABC Finds Wednesday Win with 'Lost'

Fast National ratings for Wednesday, Jan. 11, 2006
Two hours' worth of "Lost" -- one new, one a clip show -- helped ABC hold off CBS and score a ratings victory Wednesday night.

ABC drew an 8.9 rating/14 share in primetime to beat CBS' 8.3/13. NBC finished third at 6.2/10. There was a fairly steep drop from there, with fourth-place FOX coming in at 3.3/5. The WB averaged 1.9/3 and UPN 1.6/2.

Among adults 18-49, ABC's 5.8 rating was enough to score a healthy win. CBS, 4.1, finished second, followed by NBC at 3.0. FOX averaged 2.2, The WB 1.3 and UPN 1.0.
"Lost: Revelation," a clip show catching viewers up on the events of this season, scored an 8.5/13 for ABC at 8 p.m. "Still Standing," 6.0/10, and "Yes, Dear," 5.9/9, put CBS in second. NBC's "E-Ring" took third with a 5.3/8. "That '70s Show" and "Stacked" were fourth for FOX, with The WB's "One Tree Hill" coming in fifth. The premiere of UPN's drama "South Beach" struggled, scoring a 1.7/3.

At 9 p.m., a new "Lost" snagged the night's biggest audience with an 11.9/18. "Criminal Minds" was a strong second for CBS at 10.3/15. "The Biggest Loser: Special Edition" fell from its premiere last week, managing only a 4.5/7 for NBC. FOX stayed in fourth with "Nanny 911," 3.5/5. A "Beauty and the Geek" casting special on The WB was fifth, edging the second hour of the "South Beach" premiere on UPN.

"Law & Order," 8.6/14, gave NBC a first-place tie with CBS' "CSI: NY" at 10 p.m., though CBS had a slight edge in total viewers. "Invasion" was third for ABC at 6.2/10.

Ratings information is taken from fast national data, which includes live and same-day DVR viewing. All numbers are preliminary and subject to change.

From: Zap2It

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Post by destinyros2005 » 02/14/06 18:17

Abrams Addresses Lost Rumors

J.J. Abrams, co-creator of ABC's hit SF series Lost, denied to SCI FI Wire that producers were planning to kill off any characters because of an actor's off-screen behavior. In an interview at WonderCon in San Francisco on Feb. 11, Abrams specifically denied rumors that the character of Ana Lucia would die as a result of actress Michelle Rodriguez's recent highly public run-ins with the police.

"While we don't want to report on the fate of any of the characters in the show, I would say without question that any reports that anything that's going on with any of the actors as being problematic or certainly resulting in changing the storyline to sort of, you know, get rid of them is just erroneous and silliness," Abrams said.

Rodriguez grabbed headlines in December, when she was arrested in Hawaii for drunk driving. Rodriguez, 27, is scheduled to stand trial March 30 after pleading not guilty. She was also cited for speeding in Hawaii three times last year. Lost shoots in Hawaii.

Abrams, who was at WonderCon to promote his upcoming Mission: Impossible III, added: "There's a lot of stuff that has happened that's extracurricular, and it's in the news. It becomes fodder for speculation. The truth is that the cast is the greatest. I don't know if you saw the SAG Awards, but ... most of them, those who weren't working, were there and got up. ... You see who they are and how they are. They're an amazing group, all of them, and we're just blessed to get to work with them. "

For his part, Abrams said that he will dive back into Lost next season, now that M:I III is nearing completion. "I will be more involved in the show next year," he said. As for this season, he added, executive producers Damon Lindelof and Carlton Cuse "are finishing up this season. They have a very clear picture of this year and the beginning of the next. My dream would be to be able to go back and ... definitely direct an episode and at the very least ... be more involved than this year, which was incredibly peripherally because of the movie. So. People come to me and say, 'Oh, my God, I love Lost this season,' and I'm always flattered. ... I always have to say, 'I wish I could tell you that I had much more to do with it than I do, you know, this year.'" Lost airs Wednesdays at 9 p.m. ET/PT. Mission: Impossible III, starring Tom Cruise, opens May 5.

From: SciFi Wire

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Post by destinyros2005 » 02/14/06 18:19

Gross Indecency Star Lands Role on ABC-TV's "Lost"

By Andrew Gans

Emmy Award winner Michael Emerson, who portrayed Oscar Wilde in Off-Broadway's Gross Indecency, has landed a recurring role on the hit ABC-TV series "Lost."

Emerson, according to a spokesperson for the actor, will begin his "Lost" stint on the Feb. 15 broadcast. Emerson is scheduled to appear in at least six additional episodes. "Lost" airs Wednesdays at 9 PM ET on ABC-TV; check local listings.

Michael Emerson won a 2001 Emmy Award for Best Guest Actor for his work as serial killer William Hinks on "The Practice." He was most recently seen onstage in the New York Theatre Workshop's production of Bach at Leipzig. His other stage credits include Gross Indecency and the Broadway revivals of Hedda Gabler and The Iceman Cometh.

From: Playbill.com

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Post by destinyros2005 » 03/23/06 16:11

Two-hour finales for 'Alias', 'Lost', 'Housewives'

ABC has confirmed the season finale dates for its top shows.

The plans include a two-hour send-off of Alias on Monday, May 22 at 9pm ET/PT.

Top-rated medical drama Grey's Anatomy will get a three-hour finale, airing over two consecutive nights on Sunday, May 14 (10-11pm) and Monday, May 15 (9-11pm).

Desperate Housewives and Lost wrap their second seasons with two-hour finales, airing on Sunday, May 21 and Wednesday, May 24 respectively.

From: Digital Spy

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Post by destinyros2005 » 04/24/06 15:02

ABC to Launch `Lost' Interactive Game

ABC Says It Will Launch a Global Interactive Game Based on the Hit TV Show 'Lost'

ABC will launch a global interactive game based on the hit TV show "Lost," the network announced Monday.

Details, however, are about as mysterious and convoluted as the plot of the island castaway drama. The "Lost Experience" will be Internet-based and will feature a parallel story line that is not part of the TV show.

It will begin May 2 in the United Kingdom, May 3 in the U.S. and May 6 in Australia. There is no winning prize, but the experience will offer clues that could unlock some of the island's many secrets.

"It's like a giant, worldwide mysterious jigsaw puzzle that will come to life for all the world to solve," Mike Benson, senior vice president of marketing for ABC Entertainment, said in a statement.

What is known about the challenge is that it includes the introduction of new characters and the mysterious Hanso Foundation. The first clue requires finding a toll-free number that will be released during the show or commercial breaks.

Clues will vary by continent, so participants will benefit from coordinating their information. ABC said the game is designed to appeal to both fans and people unfamiliar with "Lost."

From: ABC News

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Post by destinyros2005 » 05/11/06 14:22

ABC's LOST Wraps Filming for Season 2 on Oahu, Hawaii

Hardly a week goes by when I don't get an email or two asking where folks can see ABC's LOST being filmed in Hawaii. Yesterday, May 9 was the last day of filming on Oahu until late July or August when production on Season 3 begins. A regular poster on the Hawaii Radio & TV Guide Forums reports that the company had a big wrap party Sunday night for the cast and crew, over at an oceanfront estate in Kailua, near the Aikahi Park area.

So, you won't see LOST filming for a while on Oahu, but never fear, you can still visit many of the places where the show was filmed during Seasons 1 & 2 with our features:
In Search of Filming Locations for ABC's Lost and
In Search of More Filming Locations for Lost
Then, immediately after the final episode of Season 2 ends on May 24, 2006, we'll have another feature to help you find all new LOST filming locations, including several locations from the Season 2 Final Episode.

As a teaser, my friend Ryan Ozawa went out near Makapuu Point last Saturday and got lots of photos of the Others' Camp which will be featured prominently in the season finale. One of his photos is seen along with this blog entry.

You can also keep up with the show itself including episode summaries, teasers and spoilers and everything else related to LOST at our About.com LOST website.

From: About.com

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Post by destinyros2005 » 05/15/06 15:05

Castaway says, 'Bring it on, dude'

By DAVE ITZKOFF

The more hopelessly complicated life becomes for Hurley, the husky and big-hearted castaway on the ABC drama Lost, the simpler it becomes for Jorge Garcia, who portrays him.

In the two seasons that Lost has been on the air, Hurley (whose real name is Hugo Reyes) — a wryly laconic guy who punctuates his sentences with "dude" — has been exposed as the blessed and cursed winner of a $114 million lottery jackpot, a former patient at a mental institution, and a recovering psychotic for whom the television series might simply be an extended hallucination.

While Hurley suffers, Garcia thrives, knowing that he has turned what could have been a bit part into an enduring, endearing creation: an easygoing wisecracker very much like who he is after the cameras have stopped rolling.

"You've got to have the confidence to sell what you know you have," Garcia, 33, said in a telephone interview from his home in Kailua, Hawaii. "I always had this thing in the back of my mind that said, 'Wait till they get a load of me.' "

As a college roommate at the University of California, Los Angeles, used to remind Garcia, there is no one out there who looks quite like him: he is a hulking figure of Cuban and Chilean descent, with curly, shoulder-length auburn hair and thick sideburns, and a John Belushi-like countenance that can shuttle between sincerity and irony with a single raised eyebrow.

When Garcia began his acting career, those distinctive qualities helped him build a portfolio of broad comedic performances, ranging from a cocky fast-food restaurant patron with an oversized clown hat in a commercial for Jack in the Box to a marijuana dealer on the HBO series Curb Your Enthusiasm who explains the difference between costly "hydroponic scientific stuff" and inexpensive "schwag."

That performance caught the eye of J.J. Abrams, one of the creators of Lost.

"J.J. saw Curb Your Enthusiasm, came in the next day and was like, 'We've got to get that guy,' " Garcia said proudly. "It makes you feel like you're pretty good at what you do."

Before he was cast, the role was essentially a cipher, a working-class man of unspecified age and ethnicity, whose earliest character sketches described him as a "red shirt," a term used by Star Trek fans to denote a supporting player who gets killed off quickly. ("I just assumed he wore a red shirt," Garcia said.)

But after Garcia's auditions, the producers of Lost started to make Hurley more like Garcia. To begin with, he became Hispanic. "It was kind of a no-brainer," said Javier Grillo-Marxuach, a supervising producer. "If you've got a guy named Jorge Garcia on your show, why call his character John Smith?"

He also has to carry the increasingly outlandish plot twists that befall his character. In a flashback sequence from the show's first season, Hurley got his winning lottery numbers from the ramblings of a fellow mental patient. An episode shown in April, "Dave," revealed that Hurley had emerged from a catatonic state in which he was constantly eating, and that he was plagued by visits from an imaginary friend named Dave (played by Evan Handler) trying to goad him into suicide.

Though these developments can seem harsh, the writers of Lost point out that they are also opportunities for Garcia to demonstrate that he can be more than just comic relief.

Garcia said he does not spend too much time worrying about what fresh hells the producers of Lost will concoct for Hurley, or how he will respond to them as an actor. "I get a certain freedom in the fact that Hurley was written for me," he said.

So while Lost fans spend the summer contemplating the myriad mysteries of the underground shelter called the Hatch and the belligerent islanders known as the Others, Garcia will more likely be relaxing in the company of the antique Polynesian weaponry and framed Howard Pyle pirate illustrations that decorate his walls, and maybe — just maybe — the $15,000 casino-quality card shuffler he's thinking about buying to go with the poker table he recently acquired. "I'm, like, 'Oh, man, it's so sweet,' " he said. "But my girlfriend's, like, 'If you buy that, I'm leaving you, because that's such a blatant expenditure.' "

Garcia put the telephone down momentarily to have an inaudible conversation with his girlfriend. Then he got back on the line: "She's calling me a geek right now."

From: Chron.com

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Post by destinyros2005 » 05/26/06 14:09

'Lost' finale leaves viewers a little less lost

Editor's Note: The following story contains spoilers. If you'd rather not know what happened on "Lost," please stop reading now.

Go no further if you don't want to know what happened (or may have happened).

Roughly two months -- or, more accurately, two TV seasons in real time -- after Oceanic Flight 815 crash-landed by this lost tropical island, viewers learned:

The sailboat seen at the end of last week's episode belonged to Desmond, who had been found at the start of this season in the hatch when the castaways first made their entrance. Grateful to hand to someone else the weird computer-entry task, Desmond ran away -- and set sail in the boat he had arrived in years earlier. But after 2 1/2 weeks on the water, he had gotten nowhere. "There's no outside world, there's no escape," he wailed, drunk and despondent, when the castaways retrieved him from the sailboat just offshore.

What may have caused the jetliner's crash: an excessive buildup of electromagnetic energy that Desmond, as the hatch's occupant at the time, failed to properly diffuse.

Why that numbered sequence (4, 8, 15, 16, 23, 42) needed to be entered on the keyboard every 108 minutes: To diffuse the powerful buildup safely. So the audience learned that the button really did need to be pushed, and wasn't a meaningless exercise after all, which became a season-long issue that on the finale fueled a raging argument between Locke (the disillusioned former believer) and Mr. Eko (the fiercely loyal convert to the button-pushing cause). After an explosion in the hatch, they were both unaccounted for.

Finally, Michael seemed to prove without a doubt that he would sell out his friends to save himself and his son, Walt, who was kidnapped at the end of last season by the Others.

After having been brainwashed by the Others, Michael had gunned down fellow castaways Ana Lucia and Libby a few episodes ago to facilitate the escape of Henry, an "Other" from across the island whom the castaways had been holding captive.

Then -- despite the best efforts of Jack and Sayid to outmaneuver him -- Michael made good on his plan to deliver Jack, Hurley, Sawyer and Kate to the Others in exchange for getting Walt back.

Hurley was released by the Others with an order to return to camp and warn the rest of the castaways against retaliating.

"But what about my friends?" Hurley protested.

"Your friends are coming home with us," said Henry, the Other who had been held in the hatch.

While Jack, Sawyer and Kate looked on, bound and gagged, Michael and Walt were given a motor boat to make their safe escape.

"My hunch is, you won't say a word to anybody," Henry told Michael as he sent him on his way, "because if you do, people will find out what you did to get your son back."

"Who ARE you people?" asked Michael, voicing the question that has plagued "Lost" viewers all season.

"We're the good guys, Michael," Henry said simply.

Disinclined to argue and at last reunited with Walt, Michael piloted his boat to apparent freedom.

Hoods were pulled over the heads of Jack, Sawyer and Kate. Their safety while in the Others' custody was assured by Henry. But viewers will have to wait until fall to see. (Watch how "Lost" is casting its web far and wide -- 2:02)

From: CNN

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